Royal fans find comfort knowing the Queen will be with her husband Prince Philip and family

Royal fans have been finding comfort in the knowledge the Queen will be laid to rest at Windsor next to her beloved husband Prince Philip, her parents and her sister Princess Margaret. 

Following her state funeral in Westminster Abbey on Monday, the Queen’s funeral procession will make its way to St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle. 

Her Majesty’s final resting place will be in the King George VI Memorial Chapel, which is an annex to St George’s.

Her mother and father are buried there, as are the ashes of her sister Princess Margaret. Prince Philip’s coffin, which was interred in the nearby royal vault following his death last April, will also be moved and put next to the Queen’s.

The Queen was just 25-years-old when her father died, and her life was changed irrevocably. The Queen had always had a loving relationship with her father, who had sent her a touching letter after her marriage to Prince Philip in which he said: ‘Remember that your old home is still yours and do come back to it as much and as often as possible.’

Embedded in his was another heart-felt sentence, in which he wrote: ‘Our family, us four, the “Royal Family”, must remain together – with additions of course at suitable moments!!”

She and her husband Prince Philip were in Kenya, staying at the Sagana game-viewing Lodge, when they were told on February 6, 1952, that her father, King George VI, had died. He had been suffering from lung cancer. 

The Queen’s mother and her sister Princess Margaret both died within six weeks of each other in early 2002. 

Many grieving royal followers have voiced the feeling they are finding comfort in the knowledge the family are to be reunited again in the coming week, when they will finally be reunited again as ‘us four’.

Royal fans have been finding comfort in the knowledge the Queen will be laid to rest at Windsor next to her beloved husband Prince Philip, her parents and her sister Princess Margaret

Her Majesty's final resting place will be in the King George VI Memorial Chapel, which is an annex to St George's. Her mother and father are buried there, as are the ashes of her sister Princess Margaret

Her Majesty’s final resting place will be in the King George VI Memorial Chapel, which is an annex to St George’s. Her mother and father are buried there, as are the ashes of her sister Princess Margaret

St George's Chapel itself was ordered by King Edward IV, with construction beginning in 1475 and finishing in 1528 under the reign of King Henry VIII

St George’s Chapel itself was ordered by King Edward IV, with construction beginning in 1475 and finishing in 1528 under the reign of King Henry VIII

One commented: ‘It gives me great comfort knowing she is reunited with her beloved Philip, Papa, Mum and Margaret. May her memory be a blessing to all her family.’

Meanwhile another shared a photograph of the family-of-five together, posting a white heart and a dove emoji and writing: ‘They’re all together again.’ 

A third added: ‘A brilliant young woman. Queen at just 25-years-old after her father passed away. Lifted spirits in war, brought the nation together in our toughest time, got us through a pandemic: we owe it all to her.

‘She can now finally join her husband, father, and family away somewhere else.’ 

One wrote: ‘As the Queen leaves us and this world…Her Majesty joins her father, mother, sister and her beloved Philip….They’re all together again…God has a new Star in Heaven, one that shines most Bright! God bless the Queen!’ 

Many royal fans have been finding 'great comfort' in the knowledge that the family have been reunited and will 'stay together forever' in the chapel

Many royal fans have been finding ‘great comfort’ in the knowledge that the family have been reunited and will ‘stay together forever’ in the chapel 

‘All five will be reunited again and stay together forever,’ another added, ‘The Queen will be buried at King George VI Memorial Chapel in Windsor, next to her husband, the Duke of Edinburgh, her father King George VI and mother, Queen Elizabeth and her sister Princess Margaret.’

One commented: ‘There is one positive thing for the King and the Royal Family to come from the loss of our beloved Queen Elizabeth the second; Mother and Father, Queen and grandmother; Great-grandfather and great-grandmother were devoted through their lives together, so are reunited.’  

The Queen had the memorial annex built line with her father King George VI’s wishes, who did not want to  be buried in the royal vault long-term. 

The chapel, which is just 18 feet high, 10 feet wide and 14ft deep, was completed in 1969 and was the first addition to St George’s Chapel since 1504. It cost around £25,000 and was paid for by the Queen. 

St George’s Chapel itself houses the remains of a total of 45 royals, including ten monarchs and a further seven of their consorts. The burial of the Queen will boost the former number to 11. 

The Queen and her sister Princess Margaret enjoyed a close relationship throughout their lives

The Queen and her sister Princess Margaret enjoyed a close relationship throughout their lives

The Queen and her sister Princess Margaret enjoyed a close relationship throughout their lives (pictured left and right in 1936 and 1940)  Margaret died in 2002 

Meanwhile the Queen, who died last Thursday in Balmoral, was known for her strength, stoicism and her sense of duty - having looked to her father King George VI (pictured together in 1946) for inspiration throughout her 70-year reign. He died when she was just 25-years-old

Meanwhile the Queen, who died last Thursday in Balmoral, was known for her strength, stoicism and her sense of duty – having looked to her father King George VI (pictured together in 1946) for inspiration throughout her 70-year reign. He died when she was just 25-years-old 

The Queen remained close to her mother Queen Elizabeth and Princess Margaret throughout their lives, with both women passing away in 2002 within weeks of each other

The Queen remained close to her mother Queen Elizabeth and Princess Margaret throughout their lives, with both women passing away in 2002 within weeks of each other 

Meanwhile the Queen's husband Prince Philip, who was known as her strength and stay, died last April.

Meanwhile the Queen's husband Prince Philip, who was known as her strength and stay, died last April.

Meanwhile the Queen’s husband Prince Philip, who was known as her strength and stay, died last April. Pictured left, in 1947, and right, in 2007, together 

The Queen has been lying in state at Westminster Hall since yesterday afternoon. 

Tens of thousands of Britons have queued for hours to pay their respects, with many more hoping to get inside before the solemn period ends on Monday morning. 

After Her Majesty’s state funeral, the Committal Service at St George’s Chapel will be conducted by the Dean of Windsor and feature a congregation of the late monarch’s family and friends and mourners from her household past and present, including her personal staff from across her private estates.

At the end of the final hymn, the King will place the Grenadier Guards’ Queen’s Company Colour – the royal standard of the regiment – on the coffin.

Baron Parker, the Lord Chamberlain and the most senior official in the late Queen’s royal household, will ‘break’ his Wand of Office and place it on the Coffin.

As the coffin is lowered into the royal vault the Garter King of Arms will pronounce the styles and titles of the Queen and the Sovereign’s Piper will play a lament and walk slowly away so the music fades.

It is after her final journey that Her Majesty the Queen will be laid to rest at Windsor next to her beloved husband Prince Philip. Following her state funeral in Westminster Abbey on Monday, the Queen’s funeral procession will make its way to St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle. Above: The layout of St George’s Chapel, and the location of her final resting place

Her Majesty's final resting place will be in the King George VI memorial chapel, which is an annex to St George's. Her mother and father are buried there, as are the ashes of her sister Princess Margaret. Prince Philip's coffin, which was interred in the royal vault following his death last April, will also be moved and put next to the Queen's

Her Majesty’s final resting place will be in the King George VI memorial chapel, which is an annex to St George’s. Her mother and father are buried there, as are the ashes of her sister Princess Margaret. Prince Philip’s coffin, which was interred in the royal vault following his death last April, will also be moved and put next to the Queen’s

In the evening, a private burial service will be conducted by the Dean of Windsor, attended by Charles and members of the royal family.

The monarchs and senior royals who are buried in St George’s Chapel 

King Henry VI – died 1471

King Edward IV – died 1483 

King Henry VIII – died 1547 

King Charles I – died 1649 

King George III – died 1820

King George IV – died 1830

King William IV – died 1837 

King George V of Hanover – died 1878

*George was not a king of England 

King Edward VII – died 1910

King George V – died 1936 

King George VI – died 1952

Princess Margaret – died 2002

Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother – died 2002

Queen Mary – widow of King George V 

As the Queen did with her father, Charles will drop a handful of earth onto his mother’s coffin. It will then descend a shaft for around 16ft before being sent down a corridor and set down in the vault behind its iron gates.  

At present, a black stone slab is set into the floor of the King George VI Memorial Chapel. 

It features the names George VI and his wife Elizabeth – who died in 2002 – in gold lettering, above the dates of their births and deaths. 

Near there is a slab of black-and-white diamond-shaped stones which is taken away for funerals to gain access to a lift.

Royals’ coffins are taken down the shaft for about 16ft before going down a corridor and set down in the vault behind iron gates.

Princess Margaret died just weeks before her mother and was subsequently cremated. Her ashes were initially kept in the royal vault and were then moved to the chapel to be with her parents. 

The memorial chapel was added to the north side of St George’s, behind two of the buttresses holding up the building’s north wall. 

The ceremony to transfer King George’s body there was private, as was the dedication of the chapel the following week.

St George’s Chapel itself was ordered by King Edward IV, with construction beginning in 1475 and finishing in 1528 under the reign of King Henry VIII.

Henry is among the monarchs to be buried there. The others include George III, George IV, George V and William IV.

Other royals who are buried there include Queen Victoria’s father Prince Edward, George III’s wife Queen Charlotte and Queen Mary’s grandfather Prince Adolphus.

As well as burials, successive royal weddings have been held in the chapel, including Queen Victoria’s to Prince Albert and Prince Harry’s to Meghan Markle in 2018. 

Last April, moving images showed the Queen having to sit alone due to coronavirus regulations during Prince Philip’s funeral inside the chapel.  

It is after her final journey that Her Majesty the Queen will be laid to rest at Windsor next to her beloved husband Prince Philip. Following her state funeral in Westminster Abbey on Monday, the Queen's funeral procession will make its way to St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle

An image from 1910 shows the interior of the royal vault, where Prince Philip will be moved from to join the Queen

The Queen had the memorial annex built line with her father King George VI's wishes, who did not want to be buried in the royal vault (pictured) long-term

The Queen had the memorial annex built line with her father King George VI’s wishes, who did not want to be buried in the royal vault (pictured) long-term 

An image from 1910 shows the interior of the royal vault, where Prince Philip will be moved from to join the Queen

An image from 1910 shows the interior of the royal vault, where Prince Philip will be moved from to join the Queen

The King George VI Memorial Chapel was completed in 1969 and was built behind two of the buttresses holding up the building's north wall. It is seen above in 1969

The King George VI Memorial Chapel was completed in 1969 and was built behind two of the buttresses holding up the building’s north wall. It is seen above in 1969

Last April, moving images showed the Queen having to sit alone due to coronavirus regulations during Prince Philip's funeral inside the chapel

Last April, moving images showed the Queen having to sit alone due to coronavirus regulations during Prince Philip’s funeral inside the chapel

Queen Elizabeth II watching as the coffin of her husband, the Duke of Edinburgh, is placed on the catafalque at St George's Chapel

Queen Elizabeth II watching as the coffin of her husband, the Duke of Edinburgh, is placed on the catafalque at St George’s Chapel

King George VI's funeral was held in St George's Chapel at Windsor on February 15, 1952. Above: The new Queen stands by after her father's coffin has been lowered into the royal vault

King George VI’s funeral was held in St George’s Chapel at Windsor on February 15, 1952. Above: The new Queen stands by after her father’s coffin has been lowered into the royal vault 

Earlier monarchs were laid to rest in Westminster Abbey, where they still lie in a royal vault under the Henry VII Chapel.

But it quickly filled up and George III was forced to commission a new one under the Albert Memorial Chapel in Windsor in 1810.

Plans for the Queen’s state funeral 

The Queen’s state funeral will ‘unite people across the globe and resonate with people of all faiths’ and pay a ‘fitting tribute to an extraordinary reign’, the man in charge of the historic occasion has said.

The Earl Marshal, the Duke of Norfolk, described the task as ‘both humbling and daunting. An honour and a great responsibility’.

Two thousand people including world leaders and foreign royals will gather inside Westminster Abbey in London on Monday for the final farewell to the nation’s longest reigning monarch.

After the funeral, the King and members of the royal family will walk behind the Queen’s coffin to Wellington Arch when it leaves Westminster Abbey, before it is driven to Windsor on the state hearse.

It will move from central London to Windsor, on a route that has not been disclosed by the Palace, but the hearse will travel down the famous Long Walk to the castle.

In the quadrangle, it will be joined by the King and members of the royal family who will follow behind on foot as the Queen’s coffin approaches the gothic St George’s Chapel. 

Some 800 people, including members of the Queen’s Household and Windsor estate staff, will attend the committal service afterwards at 4pm in St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle.

His daughter Princess Amelia, who died aged 27 that year, was placed in a temporary vault until the new one was ready.

She was followed seven years later by Princess Charlotte and her child before George III and his son the Duke of Kent joined them in 1820.

By this time there were 12 low tombs in the vault that were around 18 inches high and a few feet across.

Monarchs and their wives went in the centre and there was more shelving for others on York stone.

Next came George IV in 1830, then William IV in 1937, Queen Adelaide in 1849 and George V of Hanover in 1878.

The latter was Queen Victoria’s cousin and ended up in the vault because Hanover did not want him.

Some royals chose to spend time in the vault to reflect on the life of their loved one.

After George III’s daughter Princess Augusta Sophia was put there in 1840, it was reported: ‘We understand that in the course of yesterday His Royal Highness the Duke of Cambridge and his son Prince George descended into the royal vault, and stayed there some time contemplating the remains of their deceased relatives.’

This process was eased when a stone staircase was put in behind the altar in about 1837.

Victoria is understood to have frequently gone in after the Duke of Albany died in 1884 – and was followed by others.

He stayed there until he was transferred to the Albert Memorial Chapel in the summer of 1885.

After he brother prince Francis of Teck died in 1911, Queen Mary said: ”The vault looks very nice now, and is well lighted and arranged.

‘The King [Edward VII] lies on the stone in the centre for the present.’

But the storage problem reemerged in towards the end of the 1920s, with only about 24 slots left.

Crowning glory of priceless treasures

At the heart of the Crown Jewels are the Queen’s Instruments of State, which will lie on her coffin on Monday.

The Imperial State Crown boasts more than 3,000 gems – including 2,868 diamonds, 273 pearls, 17 sapphires, 11 emeralds, and five rubies.

Made in 1937 for the coronation of the Queen’s father, King George VI, it weighs in at a hefty 2lb 5oz.

During her reign, Queen Elizabeth II would wear it annually for the State Opening of Parliament, until it became too heavy for her to bear.

The Sovereign’s Sceptre with Cross has been used at every coronation since Charles II’s in 1661.

At 3ft long, it represents the monarch’s power in the secular world and holds a piece of the world’s largest diamond, the Cullinan I, which weighs in at an astonishing 530.2 carats. Meanwhile, the Sovereign’s Orb, a golden globe surmounted by a cross, reminds the monarch that their power is derived from God and is presented at a monarch’s coronation.

The ornate piece of regalia is golden and has a cross perched on top to symbolise heavenly power over the world. It is extravagantly mounted with emeralds, rubies, sapphires, diamonds, pearls and one amethyst. 

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